Tag Archives: Wage Theft

Buca di Beppo Cheated Workers Out of Wages, According to Wage Theft Lawsuit

Buca di Beppo wage theft

A wage theft lawsuit claims the Times Square location of Buca di Beppo, a nationwide Italian restaurant, failed to pay its workers minimum wages and overtime pay in violation of the Fair Labor Standards Act (“FLSA”) and the New York Labor Law.  According to a former server, Buca di Beppo maintained a policy of cheating its servers, bussers, and bartenders out of their wages by requiring them to clock out and continue working unpaid and off the clock, as well as refusing to pay them spread of hours pay when the length of their workday exceeded 10 hours.

According to the former server, Buca di Beppo required him to record his time using the restaurant’s point-of-service system, but did not allow him to accurately keep track of his hours.  He alleges that whenever he worked a double shift, Buca di Beppo required him to clock out for 30 minutes between shifts, even though he continued to work at the restaurant during that time.  When working the double shifts, the server claims his workday exceeded 10 hours, yet he never received spread of hours pay of an additional hour of pay at the minimum wage rate.

The class action lawsuit states that the server regularly worked more than 40 hours per week, yet whenever he worked more than 28 hours in a week, the restaurant would roll back and adjust his hours worked by reducing the hours on his time records.  It’s further claimed that Buca di Beppo shaved time by requiring the server to arrive at work two hours before the start of his shift to perform unpaid, off-the-clock work.

New York City’s Gramercy Tavern Will Pay $695,000 to Restaurant Workers for Wage Theft

Gramercy Tavern

Gramercy Tavern, the popular Danny Meyer-owned upscale eatery located in New York City’s Flatiron District has agreed to pay $695,000 to current and former restaurant workers for wage theft violations, including an allegedly illegal tip pool and failure to pay workers the minimum wage.  The lawsuit, brought by two former bussers, claims Gramercy Tavern engaged in unlawful tip pooling practices by requiring service employees, such as service staff, bussers, runners, captains, and other service workers to share their tips with non-service employees. According to the lawsuit, these non-service employees included expeditors, silverware polishers, wine managers, and other workers who did not regularly and customarily interact with customers.

The bussers had claimed Gramercy Tavern used a tip credit to pay its workers at the tipped minimum wage, despite retaining a portion of the tips shared by employees and requiring them to participate in the illegal tip pool with non-service employees.  Employers may not use a tip credit unless the service employees retain 100% of all tips and gratuities they receive.

The workers also alleged that Gramercy Tavern required clients to pay an automatic “service charge” of 20% of the total bill for private events, but that none of these gratuities were distributed to the event’s service workers, in violation of the New York Labor Law.

The settlement will be distributed to approximately 220 waiters, waitresses, captains, bussers, food runners, and coffee runners who worked at Gramercy Tavern at any time between June 23, 2011 and September 15, 2016.  The settlement was approved on May 17, 2017 by Judge James C. Francis, a federal judge in New York.

 

Korean Restaurant in Queens Owes $2.7 Million In Wage Theft Lawsuit

soup bowl dinner

Eleven restaurant workers at Kum Gang San restaurant in Flushing who were cheated out of their overtime, minimum wage and spread of hours pay, obtained a Decision from a New York federal court judge that they are owed $2.67 million.

The wage theft lawsuit by eight waiters, two bussers, and one kitchen worker claimed that workers were not paid required overtime and minimum wage under the Fair Labor Standards Act and the New York Labor Law, they were denied spread of hours compensation, and that the restaurant unlawfully shared in their tips and required front of the house workers to share their tips with kitchen workers. The decision by Magistrate Judge Michael Dolinger noted that the restaurant paid employees “grossly substandard wages” and diverted their tip income and “made sure to deny the workers any information that would disclose the violation of their rights.”