Tag Archives: Minimum Wage

Buca di Beppo Cheated Workers Out of Wages, According to Wage Theft Lawsuit

Buca di Beppo wage theft

A wage theft lawsuit claims the Times Square location of Buca di Beppo, a nationwide Italian restaurant, failed to pay its workers minimum wages and overtime pay in violation of the Fair Labor Standards Act (“FLSA”) and the New York Labor Law.  According to a former server, Buca di Beppo maintained a policy of cheating its servers, bussers, and bartenders out of their wages by requiring them to clock out and continue working unpaid and off the clock, as well as refusing to pay them spread of hours pay when the length of their workday exceeded 10 hours.

According to the former server, Buca di Beppo required him to record his time using the restaurant’s point-of-service system, but did not allow him to accurately keep track of his hours.  He alleges that whenever he worked a double shift, Buca di Beppo required him to clock out for 30 minutes between shifts, even though he continued to work at the restaurant during that time.  When working the double shifts, the server claims his workday exceeded 10 hours, yet he never received spread of hours pay of an additional hour of pay at the minimum wage rate.

The class action lawsuit states that the server regularly worked more than 40 hours per week, yet whenever he worked more than 28 hours in a week, the restaurant would roll back and adjust his hours worked by reducing the hours on his time records.  It’s further claimed that Buca di Beppo shaved time by requiring the server to arrive at work two hours before the start of his shift to perform unpaid, off-the-clock work.

New York City French Restaurant Bagatelle to Pay $1.1 Million for Tip Credit Violations

server restaurant image waiter tip credit

Bagatelle will pay $1.1 million to settle a wage theft lawsuit claiming that the restaurant misappropriated the tips of its food service employees and improperly used a tip credit to pay restaurant workers less than the minimum wage, in violation of the Fair Labor Standards Act and the New York Labor Law.  Bagatelle, the popular upscale French restaurant located in New York City’s Meatpacking District and self-described “NYC institution” is alleged to have required its food service workers, including servers, runners, bussers, and bartenders to share tips with tip ineligible employees, such as managers and silver polishers.   According to the lawsuit, brought by two servers who worked at the restaurant in 2015, when one of the servers asked his manager how much he had earned in tips on a particular night, he was referred to two different managers and never received an answer.

Attorneys for the workers also alleged that Bagatelle used a tip credit to pay its food service workers at the tipped minimum wage, despite failing to give them notice and requiring them to share tips with back of the house employees such as glass polishers and food expeditors.

The proposed settlement encompasses all servers, runners, bussers, and bartenders who worked at Bagatelle from January 1, 2012 to March 1, 2017.  It is estimated that the settlement will cover at least 100 workers and will be distributed in two categories: a. the amount of tips each worker received during his or her work period at Bagatelle, and b. a calculation based on total weeks worked.

10 Domino’s Franchise Locations Will Pay $480K For Violating Workers’ Rights

dominos pizza logo

New York Attorney General Eric T. Schneiderman announced settlements with three Domino’s Pizza franchisees, totaling $480,000 in restitution to hundreds of workers subject to wage and labor violations at ten different franchise locations.  The Attorney General filed a lawsuit in May 2016 against these three franchisees and their franchisor Domino’s Pizza, Inc., Domino’s Pizza LLC, and Domino’s Pizza Franchising LLC (collectively, “Domino’s”) seeking restitution from Domino’s and its franchisees for a number of alleged violations, including violations against minimum wage, overtime, and other basic labor law protections.

As part of the settlement agreements for the wage theft violations, the three franchisees will be dismissed from the lawsuit, and only the franchise Domino’s remains as a defendant.  The Attorney General has now settled investigations into labor law violations at 71 Domino’s franchise locations in New York State, owned by fifteen individual franchisees.  These locations comprise more than half of the franchise stores and over a third of the total number of Domino’s stores in New York.  The Attorney General’s office has secured nearly $2 million in total restitution for Domino’s workers statewide through these settlements.

“In the past three years, my office’s investigations have revealed a consistent and outrageous record of disregard for workers’ rights by franchisees, and as we allege, with the full knowledge of Domino’s Pizza,” Attorney General Schneiderman said. “My office will continue with our lawsuit against Domino’s Pizza to end the systemic violations of workers’ rights that have occurred in franchises across the State.  We will not allow businesses to turn a blind eye to blatant violations that are cheating hard working New Yorkers out of a fair day’s pay.”

Eight of the stores involved in the settlements announced today were owned jointly by Shueb Ahmed and Anthony Maestri, with locations in New York, Nassau and Westchester Counties.  Two of the stores were owned by Matthew Denman and located in Montgomery County.  Shueb Ahmed will pay $150,000 in restitution to workers, Matthew Denman will pay $90,000 and Anthony Maestri will pay $240,000.

In the continuing lawsuit against Domino’s, the Attorney General has asserted that Domino’s was heavily involved in the employment practices of the three franchisees and, as a result, is a joint employer of the workers at the franchisees’ stores and is responsible for underpaid wages to these workers.  The Attorney General has also alleged that Domino’s encouraged franchisees to use payroll reports from the company’s computer system (called “PULSE”), even though Domino’s knew for years that PULSE under-calculated gross wages.  Domino’s typically made multiple updates to PULSE each year, but decided not to fix the flaws that caused underpayments to workers or tell franchisees about the flaws, deeming it a “low priority.”

Montauk, Long Island 7-Eleven Settles Wage Theft Lawsuit for $199,500

7 eleven logo

A manager at the highest grossing 7-Eleven store in the United States won $199,500 in a wage theft lawsuit against 7-Eleven. Muhammad Anwar, the manager at the 7-Eleven in Montauk, New York, alleged 7-Eleven cheated him out of minimum wages, overtime pay, and spread-of-hours pay.

 

Anwar alleged that 7-Eleven steadily increased his hours and required him to work seven days a week for 18 months straight. Although the start and end time for Anwar’s shifts varied on a week-by-week basis, he claimed that throughout those 18 months, he always worked at least 80 hours per week without an uninterrupted break each day. 7-Eleven adjusted Anwar’s hours worked at the end of each week, paying him for far fewer hours than he actually worked. In one example of time shaving, Anwar claimed that 7-Eleven paid him for six hours’ worth of work, despite working 80 hours during that week.

 

In late June of 2013, the  FBI raided fourteen 7-Elevens across Long Island and Virginia for requiring their employees to work more than 100 hours per week and only paying them for a fraction of that time.  Anwar claims that after these raids, the Montauk 7-Eleven reduced his hourly wages from $25.00 to $16.00, started paying him overtime, and substantially reduced his weekly hours.

 

7-Eleven has been hit with several wage theft lawsuits recently, alleging that their stores fail to pay workers overtime pay.

‘Essen Sued for Wage Violations

Essen NY Logo

‘Essen, a to-go café with locations in Midtown East, Hell’s Kitchen, and Financial District in New York City, has been hit with a wage violation lawsuit. The lawsuit alleges that the cafe failed to pay several cooks, food preparers and salad preparers minimum wage, overtime pay, and spread-of-hours pay. The lawsuit claims that these cooks, food preparers, and salad preparers would work between 48 to 78 hours a week, and would be paid fixed weakly salaries regardless of how many hours they worked. The employees also claim that they were forced to buy “tools of the trade” such as work uniforms out of their own pockets. Lastly, the lawsuit asserts that ‘Essen required employees to sign documents claiming they were paid properly in order to disguise the actual number of hours worked by employees.

For example, one employee claims worked approximately 78 hours a week and was paid a fixed weekly salary of $550.00. His hourly wage rate for those weeks was approximately $7.00, below the minimum wage. This employee also claims was asked to sign a document which he didn’t understand in order to receive his pay, and did not receive his pay when he failed to do so.

NY Diner Found Guilty of Retaliation Against Workers

Waverly Diner Restaurant front

Waverly Restaurant, a diner in New York City’s West Village, was found guilty of retaliation against former workers in a decision by Judge Steven Davis of the National Labor Relations Board. After a three-day trial, Judge Davis found that the restaurant reduced worker hours because they had filed a federal court wage theft lawsuit against the restaurant for overtime, minimum wage, and other violations. The Judge also found that management had pressured waiters, delivery workers and bussers involved in the FLSA lawsuit to drop the suit. The restaurant workers were represented at the trial by Vivianna Morales and Louis Pechman, founder of waiterpay.com.

Benares and Baluchi’s NYC Restaurants Sued for Stiffling Delivery Workers out of Minimum Wage and Overtime Pay

Benares Indian Restaurant logo

Delivery workers at Benares and Baluchi’s Indian restaurants in New York City were not paid minimum and overtime wages, and also were cheated out of the hours that they worked, according to a wage theft lawsuit filed in Manhattan federal court. The lawsuit claims that Benares and Baluchi’s purposefully failed to keep track of the delivery workers’ hours, and that the delivery workers were paid a fixed daily salary ranging from $16 per day to $50 per day, regardless of the number of hours they actually worked.

The delivery workers claim that the restaurant failed to provide them with any notice that tips they earned would count towards their wages. In addition, the restaurants unlawfully required their delivery workers use their own money to purchase “tools of the trade,” such as bikes, helmets, lights, and bike chains. The lawsuit also claims the restaurants regularly required delivery workers to continue working without pay for at least an hour after their scheduled stop time.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jack in the Box Allegedly Misclassifies Managers To Avoid Overtime Pay

jack in the Box Logo

Jack in the Box has misclassified its store managers as overtime ineligible in order to cut its overtime pay obligations, according to a lawsuit filed in California federal court. The lawsuit claims that Jack in the Box, through a central business policy, requires its store managers to cover many work tasks of their subordinate employees. These assignments include working the drive-thru and the fryer, preparing food, cleaning up, and unloading products, as well as other like jobs. The store managers claim that despite performing these overtime pay eligible tasks, Jack in the Box mischaracterized them as ineligible for OT pay and has not paid them what they are owed. The lawsuit alleges that as result of this system, store managers were also regularly prevented from taking meal and rest breaks because they were assigned too much work and given no relief.

Jack in the Box allegedly paid its store managers a fixed salary amount that ultimately ended up being less than the minimum wage. Further, the store managers claim they were denied overtime pay although they “regularly” worked more than eight hours in a day or 40 hours in a workweek. They also claim that Jack in the Box did not reimburse them expenses for necessary travel costs in moving products between restaurants, and that they are not paid their fully owed wages upon the termination of their employment.

Servers at Le Cirque Sue For Minimum Wage and Overtime Violations

le cirque logo

A waiter at Le Cirque restaurant, recognized as one of the best restaurants in New York City, has filed a class action complaint in Manhattan federal court on behalf of all front of the house employees, other than captains, employed at the restaurant since September 17, 2008.

The lawsuit alleges that the restaurant violated the minimum wage provisions of the Fair Labor Standards Act and the New York Labor Law when it paid service employees a reduced tipped minimum wage rate without adhering to the laws’ requirements by which it could take the “tip credit.”  Attorneys for the workers claim that the restaurant should not have paid the workers the federal tipped minimum wage because the restaurant allowed captains, who were managerial employees, to share in the tips, and also failed to adequate notice of the tip credit to the service employees.

Under the Fair Labor Standards Act (“FLSA”), employers are allowed to take a “tip credit” and pay waiters, bussers, and bartenders below the federal minimum wage of $7.25 per hour. (Note: minimum wage in New York is now $8.00 per hour).  For example, the “tip credit” for waitstaff in New York is currently $3.00 per hour, meaning that waiters, busboys, and bartenders can be paid an hourly minimum wage of $5.00 per hour.  The Fair Labor Standards Act only allows employers to take this tip credit when the employees have been informed of the tip credit provisions of that law, and when the worker is allowed to retain all of the tips that he receives or is only required to share his tips with other workers who also customarily and regularly receive tips, such as servers, busboys, runners and bartenders.

The complaint against the restaurant alleges that the captains had authority to set schedules, discipline employees, grant or deny vacation requests, interview prospective employees, run pre-shift meetings, control station assignments, and recommend employees for hire, fire, and promotions.

The case against Le Cirque seeks back wages, penalties, and attorneys’ fees and costs.  This is the second lawsuit brought against Le Cirque for wage violations. Waiters who staffed private parties sued in 2009 over the restaurant’s retention of a mandatory service charge of as much as 20% paid on private parties.

Sushi Yasuda to Pay $2.4 Million to Settle Wage Claims

sushi yasuda

Sushi Yasuda, widely recognized as one of the best Japanese restaurants in New York, has settled a lawsuit for $2.4 million dollars according to a proposed settlement agreement filed in New York federal court.

The restaurant’s front of the house staff alleged that Sushi Yasuda violated the Federal Labor Standards Act (FLSA) and New York Labor Law by failing to pay employees for all the hours worked, unlawfully taking a “tip credit” and paying the employees less than the minimum wage, and failing to pay employees spread-of-hours pay when they worked more than ten hours in a day.

Sushi chefs, bussers and the waitstaff at the restaurant will receive a proportional share of the Settlement Fund based on the number of shifts they worked from December 3, 2006 to May 12, 2013.  According to the attorneys for the workers, over 100 employees will be covered by the settlement.

The restaurant recently received wide press coverage for its elimination of tips when owners decided to give customers an authentic Japanese dining experience by following the Japanese custom of not tipping.  The restaurant rolled out its policy on its bills and menus, which stated, “Following custom in Japan, Sushi Yasuda’s service staff are fully compensated by their salary.  Therefore gratuities are not accepted.  Thank you.”